• Categories

  • Pages

  • Archives

Nationwide and Global Emergency Phones Numbers

1332919142155

EXPANDED STATE-BY-STATE LISTINGS   

Alabama:  Cellphone-only: *HP (star 47)

Alaska:  911

Arizona:  911

Arkansas:  911 or Cellphone-only: *55 (star 55)

California:  911

Colorado:  911 or Cellphone-only: *CSP (star 277) or *DUI (star 384) —to report DUIs

Connecticut:  911 or (800-443-6817)

Delaware:  911

Florida:  911 or 800-459-6861 or Cellphone-only: *FHP (star 347)

Georgia:  911 or Cellphone-only: *GSP (star 477)

Hawaii:  911

Idaho:  911 or 800-233-1212 or Cellphone-only: *ISP (star 477)

Illinois:  911 or Cellphone-only: *999 (star 999)

Indiana:  911

Iowa:  911 or 800-555-HELP (800-555-4357)

Kansas:  911 (Statewide) or Cellphone-only: *HP (star 47 for Salina, KS;
*KTA (*482) —Kansas Turnpike and for Wichita, KS

Kentucky:  911 or 800-222-5555

Louisiana:  911 or Cellphone-only: *LHP (star 547);
Lake Ponchartrain Causeway: *27 (star 27 —cellphone-only) or 504-893-6250

Maine:  911 or Cellphone-only: *SP (star 77)

Maryland:  911 or Cellphone-only: #SP (pound 77)

Massachusetts:  Cellphones: *MSP (star 677) – in the 413 areacode; *SP (star 77) —outside the 413 areacode

Michigan:  911

Minnesota:  911

Mississippi:  Cellphone only: *HP (star 47)

Missouri:  Cellphone-only: *55 (star 55) or 800-525-5555

Montana:  911 (emergency only) or 800-525-5555 (non-emergency)

Nebraska:  911 or 800-525-5555 or Cellphone-only:*55 (star 55)

Nevada:  911 or Cellphone-only:*NHP (star 647)

New Hampshire:  911 or 800-622-2394 or Cellphone-only: *SP (star 77)

New Jersey:  911 or Cellphone-only: #77 (pound 77 —to report aggressive driving)

New Mexico:  911 or 505-827-9301

New York:  911

North Carolina:  Cellphone only: *HP (star 47) or 800-662-7956

North Dakota:  911

Ohio:  911 or 800-525-5555 (OHP) or 800-877-7PATROL

Ohio only, to report non-emergency safety concerns) or
800-GRAB-DUI (to report erratic driving)

Oklahoma:  Cellphone-only *55 (star 55)

Oregon:  911

Pennsylvania:  911 or Cellphone-only: *11 (star 11) —on turnpikes

Rhode Island:  911 or Cellphone-only: *SP (star 77) or 401-444-1069

South Carolina:  Cellphone only: *HP (star 47)

South Dakota:  911

Tennessee:  Cellphone-only: *THP (star 847) or 615-741-2060

Texas:  911 or 800-525-5555 or Cellphone-only: *DPS (star 377)

Utah:  911 or Cellphone-only: *11 (star 11)

Vermont:  911 or DWI Hotline: 800-GETADWI and *DWI (star 394 —cellphone-only)

Virginia:  911 or Cellphone-only: #SP (pound 77)

U.S. Virgin Islands:  911

Washington:  911

West Virginia:  Cellphone-only: *SP (star 77)

Wisconsin:  911

Wyoming:  Cellphone only: #HELP (pound 4357) or 800-442-9090

When in doubt:

0 (zero) —Operator assistance
411 —local directory assistance
(area code) + 555-1212 —non-local directory assistance

MANY STATES:  511 (for Road/Weather/Traffic Conditions)


International emergency numbers

We’ve become a global society, with many of us traveling overseas for business and vacationing. The international emergency number to dial from a cell phone is NOT 911. For all GSM cell phones, (82% of cell phones worldwide operate on the Global System for Mobile communications platform), the international emergency code is 112. This applies to all EU members, South Africa, many other African nations, India, Israel, Indonesia, Iran (don’t ask), Korea, Lebanon, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. For a complete listing, check wikipedia’s emergency telephone numbers entry.

 

In the United States, the FCC requires networks to route every mobile-phone and payphone (are there any left?) 911 call to an emergency service call center, including phones that have never had service, or whose service has lapsed.  As a result, there are programs that provide donated used mobile phones to victims of domestic violence and others especially likely to need emergency services. Over the next six years emergency responders will be able to better locate callers who dial 911 on their cellphones from indoors as the U.S. wireless industry improves caller-location for the majority of such calls.The “heightened location accuracy,” available to supporting networks and handsets, will find callers through nearby devices connected to Wi-Fi or Bluetooth that will be logged with a specific location in a special emergency-services database.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

 

Are You Letting Criminals Into Your Home? Vetting Your Service Person Before He Comes Through Your Front Door.

repairman

Think of all of the repair people who have entered your home.  Did you know them personally?  I doubt it.

Over the course of the past decade, legislation has been introduced – and often passed – to limit an employer’s ability to request a job applicant’s criminal history.  Admittedly, every speeding ticket you’ve received is in some database somewhere and can be found, but how do we as a society balance minor infractions with the right to privacy?  I’m not sure where the balance of publicly available data lies but I do know that every time we let a stranger into our home, we have exposed ourselves to potential danger.  That’s a practical assessment, not fear-mongering, but caution should be second nature to us all.  Unfortunately, life bears out the need for proactive security measures as we sadly witness from the below tragedy:

From the local ABC station:

An exterminator has been found guilty in the murder of a young pediatrician and researcher at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

35-year-old Dr. Melissa Ketunuti had graduated from Stanford University medical school, worked in Botswana and spent about five years at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia as a physician and researcher.

37-year-old Jason Smith was found guilty of murder and related offenses Wednesday. Police say he was the last person known to have visited her home.

It happened in a row house on the 1700 block of Naudain Street in January of 2013. Police say Smith from Levittown, Pa. ended up strangling Ketunuti and setting her body on fire in the basement.Shortly after he was arrested, Smith gave police a lengthy confession.

He told them Ketunuti confronted him in the basement and started questioning his work. He said he eventually became enraged and started choking her.

One such tragic incident is horrible enough but we all know from news accounts of the many instances of homicides, rapes, theft, etc. that have stemmed from letting strangers into our homes.   Giving strangers access to our homes can hardly be avoided as everyone, sooner or later, will have the need for a repair, delivery or pest removal.  We hope and trust that the stranger has been vetted but why would leave such critical background information gathering in anyone else’s hands or go on faith that the repairman is a good guy – or woman. Also, as more concierge services such as Magic emerge to help us in our busy lives, we’re removed another step from clearly being able to identify service or delivery people coming into our homes.  (Magic operates via text.  Customers text 83489 with a request – for anything from pizza delivery to an electrician service call – and Magic agents coordinate delivery/service via partnered companies.  The service calls are still in beta mode.)

Referring back to the homicide of Dr. Melissa Ketunuti,  in the below video, our friend and renowned security expert/analyst, retired law enforcement and black-belted martial artist, Steve Kardian of Defend University – a women’s self-defense institute in NY, outlines several basics of home security when admitting a service person past the front door:

1. Hire from a reputable and known company.

2. Request the full name and, as is now possible, a text photo of the operative coming to your home.  Check this info against a government photo i.d. – not the company i.d.  Of course, s/he has a government I.D. – didn’t s/he drive to your home?

3. Have someone else in the home with you during the repair appointment.

4. If you can’t have another adult with you during the service call, video and audio record the repair person, transmitting in real time to a remote pc or trusted person. (Many service people may object but remember, this complete stranger now has access to you, your family and your home. Tough.)

5. Run your own criminal background check on the repair person.  (Steve suggests various services such as Intelius that perform criminal history searches.)

In any and all cases, as Steve emphasizes, listen to your instinct.  You should be uncomfortable with a total stranger in your home.  Protect yourself as best possible – that is your only true obligation.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

Happy Father’s Day!

Happy-Fathers-Day-2012-Picture-fathers-day-Copy
Enjoy a happy, healthy, safe and wonderful Father’s Day!

Federal and State Employer Use of Arrest And Conviction Records.

job application

(From Nolo.)  Given that nearly 65,000,000 Americans have an arrest history, now more than ever we are seeing new laws to address the legal rights of a potential new hire when it comes to his/her criminal history.

There are two current federal protections in place to shield job applicants from discrimination based solely on an arrest and or conviction history. I.e. :

Federal Protections for Applicants With a Criminal Record

– Title VII: Discrimination Based on Criminal Records

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination in every aspect of employment, including screening practices and hiring. Because arrest and incarceration rates are higher for African Americans and Latinos, an employer that adopts a blanket policy of excluding all applicants with a criminal record might be guilty of race discrimination.

– The Fair Credit Reporting Act: Inaccurate Records

The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) addresses the issue of inaccurate criminal records. Criminal background checks may include errors, such as information on convictions that have been expunged, multiple listings of the same offense, incomplete information (for example, failing to report that the person was exonerated of a crime or that charges were dropped), misclassification of crimes, and even records that belong to someone else entirely.

The FCRA imposes obligations on employers who request criminal background checks and on the firms that provide them. Employers must:

  • Get the applicants written consent ahead of time.
  • Notify the applicant if the employer intends to disqualify him or her based on the contents of the report. The employer must also give the applicant a copy of the report.
  • Give the applicant notice after the employer makes a final decision not to hire him or her based on the information in the report.

Each state also has employment laws on the book in regard to hiring those with a criminal past.

New York Law on Use of Criminal Records

New York gives applicants a number of protections when it comes to employer use of criminal records in making hiring decisions. Employers may not ask about or consider arrests or charges that did not result in conviction, unless they are currently pending, when making hiring decisions. They also may not ask about or consider records that have been sealed or youthful offender adjudications.

Employer with at least ten employees may not refuse to hire an applicant based on a criminal conviction unless hiring the applicant would pose an unreasonable risk to property or to public or individual safety, or the conviction bears a direct relationship to the job. The law defines a “direct relationship” strictly to mean that the nature of the criminal conduct underlying the conviction has a direct bearing on the applicant’s fitness or ability to perform one or more of the duties or responsibilities that are necessary related to the job.

An employer that considers an applicant’s prior conviction must look at these eight factors:

  • the state’s public policy to encourage the hiring of those who have been convicted of crimes
  • the duties and responsibilities that are necessarily related to the job
  • whether the conviction has a bearing on the applicant’s ability to perform those duties and responsibilities
  • how much time has passed since the conviction(s)
  • how old the applicant was at the time of the offense
  • the seriousness of the offense
  • any information the applicant provides about his or her rehabilitation, and
  • the employer’s legitimate interest in protecting property and the safety and welfare of individuals and the public.

An employer who decides not to hire someone based on a criminal conviction must, upon the applicant’s request, provide a written statement of the reasons for the decision. This statement must be provided within 30 days of the request.

Look here for state-by-state hiring regulations and information as they relate to applicants with a criminal history.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

Locating People Who’ve Gone Off The Grid.

disappearing

Investigators are often asked to conduct subject locates. The usual paper trail: telephone records, address histories, voter registrations, professional licenses, civil and criminal court filings, Department of Motor Vehicle records, credit reporting agency records, Social Security data, etc., will, in a majority of cases, return with the subject’s current and valid contact information. But what do you do if the subject is simply not in the mainstream – for whatever reason: joblessness, homelessness or “on the run”? What then?

The success of a subject locate depends on several factors including the information provided to the investigator and the investigator’s own skills and tenacity.

We’ve put together a checklist for locating transient witnesses that has generally returned successful locates:

1. Check the name and SSN versus death records. (Don’t assume the subject is alive but definitely rule out that he isn’t.)

2. Scour social media for leads.  (We all know the drill at this point: Facebook, Instagram, etc.)

3. Interview family and friends. (Remember to request the date of  last known contact.)

4 . Upon developing a location start off point, check with local and adjoining police departments.  Electronically, check VineLink.com. (In their own words: VINELink is the online version of VINE (Victim Information and Notification Everyday), the National Victim Notification Network. This service allows crime victims to obtain timely and reliable information about criminal cases and the custody status of offenders 24 hours a day.)

5. Check with area hospitals and morgues.

6. Contact the local Salvation Army center and other charity organizations in the area.

7. If you are aware of the subject’s hobbies, (e.g., wine-tasting), scour the social groups, such as Meet-Up, for meeting events.  (We’ve backed up into subjects by identifying a particular interest and then contacting group members.)

8. Identify and canvass, if applicable,  local day worker locations and restaurant, bars and clubs – especially seasonal venues.

9. Recon area bus and train stations.

and finally, go the digital milkbox route:

10. Post a YouTube video, or Instagram picture of the subject, if family and or friends can provide reasonable current photos of the subject.  Add as many tags as you can to increase the chances of good hits.

Most importantly, though, when a case first enters a law firm, as much personal information , i.e., contact and emergency contact info should be obtained as possible. Our experience bears out that in the vast majority of situations,  someone “disappearing into thin air” is just a myth.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, be safe.

Business & Employee Background Checks – Know Your Partners, Employees & Vendors.

fingerprints

If you run a business, you have lots of worries.  Aside from the normal concerns like competition, pricing, R&D/marketing, location and customer service,  security issues  have become increasingly important.   Instinct can only take a business owner so far in assessing the work relationships in which he becomes involved.   A businessperson can run up against:

  • Employees with compromised criminal/civil litigation histories
  • Prospective partners who are less than truthful about their business (and related personal – divorce, child support, etc.) histories
  • Theft
  • Fraud
  • Embezzlement
  • Scams
  • Unscrupulous suppliers/subcontractors

In looking at the statistics of employee theft alone:

“In a recent [2014] survey of small businesses, a University of Cincinnati criminal justice researcher has found that only 16 percent of those that have experienced theft by employees actually reported that theft to the police.

That’s even though 64 percent of the small businesses surveyed reported experiencing employee theft.”

Increasingly, security tech companies pitch IT monitoring systems and control to business owners as the most effective means of controlling today’s work environment as it relates to corporate crime.  Now let’s look at the reality:

detection

The vast majority of business thefts, embezzlements and frauds are uncovered by tips, audits and by accident. Accepting these statistics as fact borne over time, what does the employer do proactively and reactively with workplace crimes?

Employee Background Checks Provide the Answer

Certainly there are many free online tools of which prospective employers can avail themselves to research their employees backgrounds, but such a search should just be a cursory check, pre-hire. Working with an experienced investigator will yield formerly-hidden information as the professional background checker knows what to look for and where to look for it  – often in databases that are not easily available to the general public and through a process of key data analysis that can only be borne of experience, inclination and talent.

Here are the types of things a business owner can and should be looking into for the protection of his business:

Criminal Background Checks

Any time your business is dealing with someone you don’t know, you should run a quick check to see if they have any history of criminal activity. It’s very simple to find out about criminal records, FBI records, prison records and sex offender status.  There is access to their entire criminal history if there is one. With violence in the workplace such a major issue, a simple criminal check can be a very effective way to avoid problems before they happen.

Background Check for Employment (Pre-Employment Screening)

If you’ve got a small business, you should be pre-screening each person you consider hiring. No matter how professional, or how harmless, they appear.

A small print shop franchise in Florida hired an especially friendly fellow as their bookkeeper after the owner got too busy to handle it himself. The new employee didn’t offer much in the way of references but he sounded like he knew what he was doing and – big plus – he agreed to work cheap. The owner figured he would save money hiring the guy. He figured wrong.

The bookkeeper drained more than a hundred thousand dollars out of the company before they found him out. Turned out he’d previously been charged with embezzlement.  This is something a criminal background check would have quickly turned up. (Tip: Your investigator should know the positions sought by would-be new hires.  If a crime is directly related to the employee’s duties, [e.g., previous theft charges/accounts payable job], that history would certainly be a direct factor in the hiring decision.)

Background Check Existing Employees – Make it a Condition of Employment

You shouldn’t check only new hires. Over time, employees can develop habits and get involved in activities you’d never suspect. So you should regularly check on existing employees. Note: this is something you should get legal advice for – but generally if it’s a condition of employment and you let them know in writing, it’s not invading privacy. You entrust employees with company funds or materials that can be stolen, or negotiating and purchasing power that can be abused. Keeping an eye on existing employees is just being prudent.

Run a Background Check on Each Company or Individual You Do Business With

You should investigate every supplier or contractor who serves your business. If the possibility of harm exists, then you need to know if someone you’re in business with is likely to harm you. You can check credit, check backgrounds of the owners and managers, check the company itself for any past criminal or questionable activity.

Run a Background Check on Each Partner With Which You Intend Do Business.

Here at BNI we’ve worked with numerous matters involving prospective and current business partners.  Our clients come to a realization during our investigations that either the partner is upstanding or s/he is seeking a working relationship that is covertly dishonest due to personal and professional issues, (i.e., expensive divorces, costly child support litigation, past debt, etc.)  Especially those who are very close to your business  – your means of support –  should be thoroughly vetted and, moreso after the partnership is active and red flags begin to appear.  Our intent and focus during partnership investigations are on collecting information that can be used in potential criminal and civil litigation.

I’m not relating anything in this post that you, as the business owner, have not already considered or experienced but I’ll add the important point that with today’s tech tools, conducting this type of business due diligence is cost-effective and results-effective and is easily set up on an as-needed scheduling basis.

Given the increasing transiency and mobility of our work relationships, it is smart to proactively protect your business, rather than the latter, often very expensive clean-up required in the aftermath of personnel failure.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, be safe.

Diabetic Reaction or Drunk Driving?

Technology-100PercentTesting

Good company: great product. TruTouchTechnologies, immediate dermal alcohol testing results.

In a previous Bulletin, we brought your attention to a great company with an important, life-saving message and product:

TruTouch Technologies has developed a non-invasive device that measures blood chemistry in a driver by shining a light through skin on the forearm and then analyzing the results.  Previously used for diabetes testing, this type of technology is now advanced to measure alcohol through the skin’s layers.

A New Strategy to Discourage Driving Drunk

Visit the company’s site and discover the broad applications of this type technology.  We’ve recommended Tru-Touch to clients in the aviation, transportation and construction industries.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, be safe.

 

Memorial Day 2015

memorial day

 

Thank you to the men and women who served to protect our freedom.

 

8 Sure Signs That Your Computer Has Been Hacked (Owned) & A Free Email Tester

hacked

I’m not going to go into a long-winded definition of hacking.  We all know what it is and have all experienced malware in some form or to some degree with our computing experiences.

Cutting to the chase then,  below are eight clear signs that your system is compromised, followed by a free online tool that tells you immediately if your email has been compromised.

No. 1: Fake antivirus messages

Fake antivirus warning messages are among the surest signs that your system has been compromised.  (By the time you see this warning, the damage has been done.  Clicking No or Cancel will do nothing to stop the virus.  The malicious software has already corrupted your PC – often through the Java Runtime Environment or an Adobe product,)

What to do: As soon as you notice the fake antivirus warning message, power down your computer. Boot up the computer system in Safe Mode, No Networking, and try to uninstall the newly installed malware (oftentimes it can be uninstalled like a regular program). Either way, follow up by trying to restore your system to a state previous to the exploitation. If successful, test the computer in regular mode and make sure that the fake antivirus warnings are gone. Then follow up with a complete antivirus scan. Oftentimes, the scanner will find other malware remnants left behind.

No. 2: Unwanted browser toolbars

This is probably the second most common sign of system corruption: Your browser has multiple new toolbars.

What to do: Most browsers allow you to review installed and active toolbars. Remove any you didn’t absolutely want to install. When in doubt, remove it. If the bogus toolbar isn’t listed there or you can’t easily remove it, see if your browser has an option to reset the browser back to its default settings. If this doesn’t work, follow the instructions listed above for fake antivirus messages.

No. 3: Redirected Internet searches

You can often spot this type of malware by typing a few related, very common words (for example, “puppy” or “goldfish”) into Internet search engines and checking to see whether the same websites appear in the results — almost always with no actual relevance to your terms.
What to do: Follow the same instructions as above. Usually removing the bogus toolbars and programs is enough to get rid of malicious redirection.

No. 4: Frequent random popups

This popular sign that you’ve been hacked is also one of the more annoying ones. When you’re getting random browser pop-ups from websites that don’t normally generate them, your system has been compromised.  Even legitimate websites, can bypass your browser’s anti-pop-up mechanisms.

What to do: Once again, typically, random pop-ups are generated by one of the three previous malicious mechanisms noted above. You’ll need to get rid of bogus toolbars and other programs if you even hope to get rid of the pop-ups.

No. 5: Your contacts receive fake emails from your email account

This is the one scenario where you might be OK. It’s fairly common for our email contacts to receive malicious emails from us. A decade ago, when email attachment viruses were all the rage, it was very common for malware programs to survey your email address book and send malicious emails to everyone in it.

These days it’s more common for malicious emails to be sent to some of your contacts, but not everyone in your email address book. If it’s just a few contacts and not everyone in your email list, then more than likely your computer hasn’t been compromised (at least with an email address-hunting malware program). These days malware programs and hackers often pull email addresses and contact lists from social media sites, but doing so means obtaining a very incomplete list of your contacts’ email addresses. Although not always the case, the bogus emails they send to your contacts often don’t have your email address as the sender. It may have your name, but not your correct email address. If this is the case, then usually your computer is safe.

What to do: If one or more contacts reports receiving bogus emails claiming to be from you, do your due diligence and run a complete antivirus scan on your computer, followed by looking for unwanted installed programs and toolbars. Often it’s nothing to worry about, but a check-up can’t hurt.

No. 6: Unexpected software installs

Unwanted and unexpected software installs are a big sign that your computer system has likely been hacked.

In the early days of malware, most programs were computer viruses, which work by modifying other legitimate programs. They did this to better hide themselves. For whatever reason, most malware programs these days are Trojans and worms, and they typically install themselves like legitimate programs. This may be because their creators are trying to walk a very thin line when the courts catch up to them. They can attempt to say something like, “But we are a legitimate software company.” Oftentimes the unwanted software is legally installed by other programs, so read your license agreements. Frequently, I’ll read license agreements that plainly state that they will be installing one or more other programs. Sometimes you can opt out of these other installed programs; other times you can’t.

What to do: There are many free programs that show you all your installed programs and let you selectively disable them. One favorite is Autoruns. It doesn’t show you every program installed but will tell you the ones that automatically start themselves when your PC is restarted. Most malware programs can be found here. The hard part is determining what is and what isn’t legitimate. When in doubt, disable the unrecognized program, reboot the PC, and re-enable the program only if some needed functionality is no longer working.

No. 7: Your mouse moves between programs and makes correct selections

If your mouse pointer moves itself while making selections that work, you’ve definitely been hacked. Mouse pointers often move randomly, usually due to hardware problems. But if the movements involve making the correct choices to run particular programs, malicious humans are somewhere involved.

Not as common as some of the other attacks, many hackers will break into a computer, wait for it to be idle for a long time (like after midnight), then try to steal your money. Hackers will break into bank accounts and transfer money, trade your stocks, and do all sorts of rogue actions, all designed to lighten your cash load.

What to do: If your computer “comes alive” one night, take a minute before turning it off to determine what the intruders are interested in. Don’t let them rob you, but it will be useful to see what things they are looking at and trying to compromise. If you have a cellphone handy, take a few pictures to document their tasks. When it makes sense, power off the computer. Unhook it from the network (or disable the wireless router) and call in the professionals. This is the one time that you’re going to need expert help.

Using another known good computer, immediately change all your other logon names and passwords. Check your bank account transaction histories, stock accounts, and so on. Consider paying for a credit-monitoring service. If you’ve been a victim of this attack, you have to take it seriously. Complete restore of the computer is the only option you should choose for recovery. But if you’ve lost any money, make sure to let the forensics team make a copy first. If you’ve suffered a loss, call law enforcement and file a case. You’ll need this information to best recover your real money losses, if any.

No. 8: Your antimalware software, Task Manager, or Registry Editor is disabled and can’t be restarted

This is a huge sign of malicious compromise. If you notice that your antimalware software is disabled and you didn’t do it, you’re probably exploited — especially if you try to start Task Manager or Registry Editor and they won’t start, start and disappear, or start in a reduced state. This is very common for malware to do.

What to do: You should really perform a complete restore because there is no telling what has happened. But if you want to try something less drastic first, research the many methods on how to restore the lost functionality (any Internet search engine will return lots of results), then restart your computer in Safe Mode and start the hard work. I say “hard work” because usually it isn’t easy or quick.

HAS YOUR EMAIL BEEN HACKED?

A major concern we all have is whether our email accounts have been hacked/owned and that we might experience data leaks if that is the case.  I use this one very reliable digital tool to test for any emails breaches:

PWNEDLIST.COM

(Most legit email testers or anti-hacking sites substitute the “O” in “owned” with a “p” to lessen the confusion between the letter and the numeral zero.)

General rule of thumb regarding online security: If it feels weird, it is.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

Can A Burglar Access Your Home Via Key Entry? He Can in 90% of U.S. Homes.

lock-bumping

 

Summer vacation time is upon us and so therefore are home burglaries.    And let’s face it – with a sluggish economy, disenfranchised law enforcement and the uptick in family travel and vacation during the summer months, one can reasonably presume that the number of home break-ins will increase dramatically during the next several months. From time to time in the upcoming weeks, we will post security tips that we hope will increase your personal security risks and management.

This week we will concentrate on the first usual point of entry – the family home door.  Whether it is the front, side or basement door, burglars know how to get inside and to your property.

As if evilly purposed technology isn’t bad enough, the old-fashioned methods of breaking and entry are still widely used by burglars.

A phenomenon known as ‘lock bumping’ is on the rise. It’s a little-known technique that’s fast, simple, and very discreet.  It draws far less attention than breaking in a window or tearing down a door.  If your cylindrical door lock is one of the more popular brands or models on the market – and 90% of home door locks are cylinder-models and ACME types – you’re vulnerable to this particular type of illegal home entry. Lock-bumping requires a bump key.

What is a Bump Key?

A bump key is a key in which all the cuts are at the maximum depth (999). Bump keys can be cut for standard pin tumbler type locks as well as “dimple” locks.   (From lockwiki: A dimple lock is a pin-tumbler-based lock design that uses flat side of the key blade as a bitting area. Cuts on the bitting area resemble dimples, hence the name. This contrasts traditional pin-tumblers that use the edge of the blade as the primary bitting area.)

 

How is lock bumped?

Steps

  1. Bump a Lock Step 1.jpg
    A key type is determined that fits inside the target lock. In most cases, a particular model of lock will accept all keys from that model because only the teeth of the keys are different. In other words (and as mentioned above), once a burglar has an Acme-model bump key, it could open all other Acme-model locks.
  2. Bump a Lock Step 2.jpg
    Obtain a bump key. There are two ways to obtain a bump key: one way is buy the type of key for the model lock in question and ask the locksmith to lathe a “999” key, a kind of key where all the valleys are at the deepest possible setting.   OR
  3. Bump a Lock Step 3.jpg
    Cut one’s own bump key. With a copy of the key in question made, a burglar will then use a metal file to create his own bump key.  All of the valleys are filed down so that they are even with the lowest point in the teeth.
  1. Bump a Lock Step 4.jpg
    4
    Insert the key into the lock, then pull it out one “click,” so it is almost in all the way, but not quite. While pushing or pulling on the edge of the key in the desired turning direction, sharply strike the back end of the key with a solid object such as the back of a screwdriver. If done correctly, the key will turn in the direction it is being pushed or pulled in, and the door can then be unlocked. If not, simply repeat this step until it works or you decide to stop.
Of course, then there is this simple bump method:
A special “bump” key is inserted into the target lock and then struck with a tool made of rubber or plastic, such as this blue tool on the bottom of the image. The impact of the bump key on the tumblers inside the lock temporarily pushes them up, allowing the lock’s cylinder to turn. When done right — and it’s not hard to learn — this method can quickly and quietly open a lock.

In our next mid-week Beacon Bulletin, we will bring you information and videos on how to bump lock-proof your home.Just remember that your personal safety and that of your family is paramount.  Whatever knowledge in this area that we may impart, do not back up it with a plan to confront a burglar unless it is absolutely necessary. If a successful entry does occur, hopefully, no one will be home and material possessions are not worth a life.

BNI Operatives; Situationally aware.

 

As always, stay safe.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 221 other followers