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Charities Review: 25 Top Charities, Part II of II

Rounding out our two-part series on charities evaluation, this week we bring you the opposite of last week’s  report on the top 25 worst charities with the top 25 Best Charities in terms of Return on Donation (ROD), i.e. how much of your donation actually goes to the intended purpose/person rather than the costs of solicitation.

The below list was prepared (and reprinted with permission) from Forbes:

Values calculated November 2013

Rank Name Private Support ($mil) Total Revenue ($mil) Fundraising Efficiency (%)  
1

United Way

3,926 4,260 91
2

Salvation Army

1,885 4,078 89
3

Task Force for Global Health

1,660 1,664 100
4

Feeding America

1,511 1,554 98
5

Catholic Charities USA

1,447 4,393 95
6

Goodwill Industries International

949 4,895 97
7

Food for the Poor

891 900 97
8

American Cancer Society

889 925 76
9

The Y-YMCA

827 6,240 85
10

World Vision

826 1,014 87
11

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

802 972 83
12

Boys & Girls Clubs of America

699 1,573 87
13

American National Red Cross

687 3,118 75
14

Habitat for Humanity International

674 1,492 83
15

Feed the Children

614 618 94
16

Compassion International

596 599 91
17

Nature Conservancy

536 797 84
18

AmeriCares Foundation

525 526 98
19

American Heart Association

511 618 84
20

Campus Crusade for Christ

503 548 91
21

United States Fund for UNICEF

498 502 93
22

Direct Relief

392 392 100
23

Mayo Clinic

380 3,739 92
24

Lutheran Services in America

373 20,980 81
25

CARE USA

369 558 94

Charities Revealed: 25 Worst Charities, Part I of II

Donation Box, concept of Donation

With the holidays just around the proverbial corner, out comes that big end of year push by the majority of charities to meet their annual  fundraising goals.  Aggressive pursuit of charitable donations is a good, honorable thing – if effective.  Americans, and people worldwide, are known for their big hearts, in times of urgency and in general.  And give we do.  To the tune of nearly a billion dollars annually.  But is this generosity really meeting the needs of the causes we support?

The most accurate measure available to us is that of Return on Donation; ROD –  the comparison of monies raised v. monies spent on solicitation of those charitable contributions.  Below is a list of the nation’s top (worst?) charities as determined by this analysis and as we can clearly see, often the charity is still operating just to exist. The intended recipients of these charities are not benefiting from the monies collected on their behalf.  (America’s Worst Charities is the result of a yearlong collaboration between the Tampa Bay Times and the California-based Center for Investigative Reporting, the nation’s largest and longest-serving nonprofit newsroom dedicated to watchdog journalism. CNN joined the partnership in March 2013.)

THE 25 WORST CHARITIES, RANKED BY MONEY SPENT ON SOLICITING COSTS

Totals from the latest 10 years of available federal tax filings

Rank Charity name Total raised by solicitors Paid to solicitors % spent on direct cash aid
1 Kids Wish Network $127.8 million $109.8 million 2.5%
2 Cancer Fund of America $98.0 million $80.4 million 0.9%
3 Children’s Wish Foundation International $96.8 million $63.6 million 10.8%
4 American Breast Cancer Foundation $80.8 million $59.8 million 5.3%
5 Firefighters Charitable Foundation $63.8 million $54.7 million 8.4%
6 Breast Cancer Relief Foundation $63.9 million $44.8 million 2.2%
7 International Union of Police Associations, AFL-CIO $57.2 million $41.4 million 0.5%
8 National Veterans Service Fund $70.2 million $36.9 million 7.8%
9 American Association of State Troopers $45.0 million $36.0 million 8.6%
10 Children’s Cancer Fund of America $37.5 million $29.2 million 5.3%
11 Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation $34.7 million $27.6 million 0.6%
12 Youth Development Fund $29.7 million $24.5 million 0.8%
13 Committee For Missing Children $26.9 million $23.8 million 0.8%
14 Association for Firefighters and Paramedics $23.2 million $20.8 million 3.1%
15 Project Cure (Bradenton, FL) $51.5 million $20.4 million 0.0%
16 National Caregiving Foundation $22.3 million $18.1 million 3.5%
17 Operation Lookout National Center for Missing Youth $19.6 million $16.1 million 0.0%
18 United States Deputy Sheriffs’ Association $23.1 million $15.9 million 0.6%
19 Vietnow National Headquarters $18.1 million $15.9 million 2.9%
20 Police Protective Fund $34.9 million $14.8 million 0.8%
21 National Cancer Coalition $41.5 million $14.0 million 1.1%
22 Woman To Woman Breast Cancer Foundation $14.5 million $13.7 million 0.4%
23 American Foundation For Disabled Children $16.4 million $13.4 million 0.8%
24 The Veterans Fund $15.7 million $12.9 million 2.3%
25 Heart Support of America $33.0 million $11.0 million 3.4%

Keep your hearts open – just ensure a viable ROD for your contribution.  To that end, next week in Charities Revealed, we bring you a well-researched list of the top 25 Best Charities, again, in terms of Return on Donation, ROD.

BNI Operatives: Street smart; info savvy.

As always, stay safe.

 

 

Happy Columbus Day!

columbus day

Special Edition: How Likely Are You To Contract Ebola? Become Informed.

This morning’s death in Texas of Mr. Thomas Eric Duncan,  marks the first death (ever) from Ebola in America.  Mr. Duncan, a Liberian man who had traveled to Texas to visit family, was the first person to be diagnosed with the disease while in the U.S. and became the first person to die of the disease in the U.S.   Before widespread panic sets in, let’s look at the facts.

How contagious is Ebola?

ebola r

Hopefully, the CDC’s optimism is called for in that the congation-effect of Ebola all comes down to something called “R0.”

The reproduction number, or “R nought,” is a mathematical term that tells you how contagious an infectious disease is. Specifically, it’s the number of people who catch the disease from one sick person, on average, in an outbreak.*

Take, for example, measles. The virus is one of the most contagious diseases known to man. It’s R0 sits around 18. That means each person with the measles spreads it to 18 people, on average, when nobody is vaccinated. (When everyone is vaccinated, the R0 drops to essentially zero for measles).

And that brings us back to Ebola. Despite its nasty reputation, the virus’s R0 really isn’t that impressive. It typically sits around 1.5 to 2.0.

Even in the current epidemic in West Africa, where the virus has been out of control, each person who has gotten sick has spread Ebola to only about two others, on average.Why is that?

Many factors contribute to the R0, such as how long you’re infectious** and how many virus particles are needed to make another person sick.

Now at this point, you’re probably thinking, “OK. But an R0 of 2 is nothing to brush off.” You’re right. R0 of 2 means one person infects two people, who then infect four people, then eight, 16, 32 — the numbers go up fast.

But that isn’t likely to happen in a place with a good public health system, a first world country because people with Ebola aren’t contagious until they show symptoms.

Ebola virus disease

Fact sheet N°103
Updated September 2014


Key facts

  • Ebola virus disease (EVD), formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever, is a severe, often fatal illness in humans.
  • The virus is transmitted to people from wild animals and spreads in the human population through human-to-human transmission.
  • The average EVD case fatality rate is around 50%. Case fatality rates have varied from 25% to 90% in past outbreaks.
  • The first EVD outbreaks occurred in remote villages in Central Africa, near tropical rainforests, but the most recent outbreak in west Africa has involved major urban as well as rural areas.
  • Community engagement is key to successfully controlling outbreaks. Good outbreak control relies on applying a package of interventions, namely case management, surveillance and contact tracing, a good laboratory service, safe burials and social mobilisation.
  • Early supportive care with rehydration, symptomatic treatment improves survival. There is as yet no licensed treatment proven to neutralise the virus but a range of blood, immunological and drug therapies are under development.
  • There are currently no licensed Ebola vaccines but 2 potential candidates are undergoing evaluation.

    Background

    The Ebola virus causes an acute, serious illness which is often fatal if untreated. Ebola virus disease (EVD) first appeared in 1976 in 2 simultaneous outbreaks, one in Nzara, Sudan, and the other in Yambuku, Democratic Republic of Congo. The latter occurred in a village near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name.

    The current outbreak in west Africa, (first cases notified in March 2014), is the largest and most complex Ebola outbreak since the Ebola virus was first discovered in 1976. There have been more cases and deaths in this outbreak than all others combined. It has also spread between countries starting in Guinea then spreading across land borders to Sierra Leone and Liberia, by air (via travelers.

    The most severely affected countries, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia have very weak health systems, lacking human and infrastructural resources, having only recently emerged from long periods of conflict and instability. On August 8, the WHO Director-General declared this outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

    A separate, unrelated Ebola outbreak began in Boende, Equateur, an isolated part of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

     

    =============================================================================================

    At the time of this article, a second case of Ebola is suspected in Texas.  A sheriff’s deputy, said to have served the warrant (for physical possession of the victim) to Mr. Duncan’s home prior to his death, is now under watch for the deadly virus.  We will keep you posted.

BNI Operatives: Street smart; info savvy.

As always, stay safe.

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