Can A Burglar Access Your Home Via Key Entry? He Can in 90% of U.S. Homes.

lock-bumping

 

Memorial Day weekend is upon us and so therefore are home burglaries.    And let’s face it – with the uptick in family travel and vacation during holidays and the fast-approaching summer season, one can reasonably presume that the number of home break-ins will increase dramatically during the next several months. From time to time in the upcoming weeks, we will post security tips that we hope will increase your personal security risks and management.

This week we will concentrate on the first usual point of entry – the family home door.  Whether it is the front, side or basement door, burglars know how to get inside and to your property.

As if evilly purposed technology isn’t bad enough, the old-fashioned methods of breaking and entry are still widely used by burglars.

A phenomenon known as ‘lock bumping’ is on the rise. It’s a little-known technique that’s fast, simple, and very discreet.  It draws far less attention than breaking in a window or tearing down a door.  If your cylindrical door lock is one of the more popular brands or models on the market – and 90% of home door locks are cylinder-models and ACME types – you’re vulnerable to this particular type of illegal home entry. Lock-bumping requires a bump key.

What is a Bump Key?

A bump key is a key in which all the cuts are at the maximum depth (999). Bump keys can be cut for standard pin tumbler type locks as well as “dimple” locks.   (From lockwiki: A dimple lock is a pin-tumbler-based lock design that uses flat side of the key blade as a bitting area. Cuts on the bitting area resemble dimples, hence the name. This contrasts traditional pin-tumblers that use the edge of the blade as the primary bitting area.)

 

How is lock bumped?

Steps

Image titled Bump a Lock Step 1

  1. A key type is determined that fits inside the target lock. In most cases, a particular model of lock will accept all keys from that model because only the teeth of the keys are different. In other words (and as mentioned above), once a burglar has an Acme-model bump key, it could open all other Acme-model locks.

    Image titled Bump a Lock Step 2

  2. Obtain a bump key. There are two ways to obtain a bump key: one way is buy the type of key for the model lock in question and ask the locksmith to lathe a “999” key, a kind of key where all the valleys are at the deepest possible setting.   ORImage titled Bump a Lock Step 3
  3. Cut one’s own bump key. With a copy of the key in question made, a burglar will then use a metal file to create his own bump key.  All of the valleys are filed down so that they are even with the lowest point in the teeth.
Of course, then there is this simple bump method:
A special “bump” key is inserted into the target lock and then struck with a tool made of rubber or plastic, such as this blue tool on the bottom of the image. The impact of the bump key on the tumblers inside the lock temporarily pushes them up, allowing the lock’s cylinder to turn. When done right — and it’s not hard to learn — this method can quickly and quietly open a lock.
In our next mid-week Beacon Bulletin, we will bring you information and videos on how to bump lock-proof your home.Just remember that your personal safety and that of your family is paramount.  Whatever knowledge in this area that we may impart, do not back up it with a plan to confront a burglar unless it is absolutely necessary. If a successful entry does occur, hopefully, no one will be home and material possessions are not worth a life.

BNI Operatives; Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

Real Life Cyborg Hacks That People Have Implanted In Them Right Now

Aside from the nation being warned by credible intelligence sources that the new wave of terrorism will involve surgically implanted explosive devices (SIEDs) within human beings, there are other positive uses for our now cyborg bodies. (A cyborg is defined as a “being” that contains biological and mechanical – robotic or other artificial – parts.)
Several examples of positive cyborg enhancements are:

Multi-Purpose Hand Implant Chips

We’ve all lost (misplaced) keys, credit cards, driver’s licenses… But just suppose you could store your valuable items in one hand?  Literally, “in” your hand.  Seattle company, Dangerous Things, touts a small multi-purpose RFID implant that can replace all of your must have items.

From The Modern Rogue:  “The RFID chips that you implant in your hand or wrist, are a sort of multipurpose identification/unlocking/communication tool. Need to open your door? It can function as a key card — the inventor of the device, biohacking pioneer Amal Graafstra, uses his implant to unlock the door to his house. Passport control? The implant can contain the same information biometric passports do (though good luck getting through airport security without a real passport until these things become the norm). It could store your personal data, health stats, and even financial information.”

 

 PetaPixel.com

The Eyeball Camera

Filmmaker Rob Spence happened to have a  nonfunctional blind eye in his socket, so he had it removed, replacing it with a specially built camera.  While the recording capability may raise privacy concerns (ala the fiasco that was Google’s Glass recorder eyewear that provoked such a negative response that the item was deep-sixed- well, for now), the positive usage is obvious – those who couldn’t “see” now can via record and playback or, I imagine as the technology continues to evolve, view in real time.

 

 The Verge

Finger Magnets

We haven’t quite figured out beyond the “cool” factor how tiny magnets surgically implanted into one’s fingertips will revolutionize mankind yet but they certainly make picking up metal stuff a lot of fun!  Theoretically, though, these magnets can aid with helping those who’ve lost sensory abilities in their hands to use eating utensils, operate machinery and just about any other function that requires interaction with metal in our lives. (Presumably there are control functions that turn on and off the magnetivity.)

The research for this article was fun and occasionally, we all need to lighten up, so we hope you have enjoyed this brief interlude from our generally serious topics!

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

 

Using Someone Else’s WiFi- Can They See Your Activity?

Several times a week, we are asked this exact question – If I am using someone else’s WiFi,  can they see my search history, read my email or otherwise monitor my activity?

Simply put- unless they are extraordinarily gifted tech geniuses, not really.  In other words, they can see that you are connected to their WiFi and can see the length of connection but your device’s anti-virus and other firewall programs will prevent them from accessing your desk/lap tops hard drive and other devices’ internal and cloud storage.

That said, if you are up against a very savvy tech thief, (the types that sit outside hotels and passively offer free connection bait – usually ones that looks very similar in name to the hotel’s WiFi, e.g. MarriottGuest1 rather than MarriottGuest), bide these steps (added to by our friends over at xqiz.it :

1) Most importantly, use HTTPS.

2) You should use non-logging DNS servers (hint: NOT Google’s DNS servers).

(At this point, in the US, you are reasonably well protected from someone doing a man-in-the-middle read of your communication. Unless you know how to manually manage your certs, you’re never safe in other countries, particularly places like China and any of the former Soviet states, where the governments tend to have access to the certificates that the local cert authorities provide for encryption and signature validation.)

3) Java and Flash must both be disabled. Failing to disable these allows local code to go around the settings you use from above. (Little known industry secret: Most sites that use Flash use small pieces of invisible Flash content to track you.)

4) Do not use Chrome. Its primary purpose is to de-anonymize you so that Google can track you completely.

5) Use the private surfing option in your browser (preferably Firefox) to reduce the chance that your browser fingerprint is discernible (unique/identifiable) by the server.

Our advice? Use common sense- if in public, be very careful; if in private, know your source.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As Always,

Stay safe.

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