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The Safest Seats On A Plane, Train or Cruise Ship

As holiday travel begins, we are once again asked for hard data on travel safety- specifically, the safest seats on various means of travel.   To that inquiry, our research indicates the following:

 

The safest seat on an airplane:

A recently published Popular Mechanics study concludes that, in an airplane crash, 69% of rear cabin passengers are more likely to survive than those in the front rows (generally the first and business classes or in all-coach flights, the first 15 rows).  In the same situation, over the wing seat passengers experience a 59% survival rate, which then drops dramatically to 49% for those in the aforementioned front rows.  Statistics show that the middle seats in the rear of an aircraft historically have the highest survival rates.  (Bear in mind, however,  that many factors are involved in aircraft mishaps that shape an incident; these statistics are based on otherwise “routine” flights in a standard design planes (rather than military or supersonic aircraft).

 

The safest seat on a railroad passenger train:

A railroad car or two ahead of the rear car is the safest seat on a passenger train.  According to the U.S. government’s transportation accident investigation authority, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), a  majority  of passenger rail mishaps damage the front cars; secondly, the middle cars in derailment situations; with the least damage occurring to the near to end cars.  Of course, in the case of a front to rear collision between two trains, the first train will suffer rear car damage, obviously, the first car(s) of the second train will suffer the most damage but these are the rarest collision types.  Final tip: choose a rear facing seat (in the direction of travel).  In a crash, you won’t be thrown forward.

The safest cabin on a cruise ship:

From the Cruise Critic, the safest berths on a cruise ship are the mid to upper cabins, facing outward, in the ship’s aft (rear) section.  Cruise line accidents, while extremely rare, tend to damage the hull (usually in the  front part) first, thereby exposing the lower and inner cabins to immediate flooding as well as by positioning alone, these cabins have more restricted avenues of escape.  Overall, we recommend staying away from any cruises along the Somalian coast, regardless of cabin choice.

We hope the above does not engender paranoia; you are safer traveling than you are in your own home:

The most recent statistics from the National Safety Council show that death by falling from a bed, chair or other furniture is almost as likely as death by air transport.  As of 2016, your odds of dying from an in-home fall are about 1 in 379,000 while your risk in an airplane is about 1 in 484,000.  You are safer hurtling through the air at 530 mph in a  metal container than you are standing on a chair in your own home reaching for a can of tuna.

Our Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, and especially when traveling, stay safe.

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Happy Thanksgiving 2018!

Wishing our readers a happy and festive Thanksgiving with beloved family and friends!   And here’s to another year of giving thanks for all of the wonderful blessings our team has experienced!! 

Happy Thanksgiving from Beacon Network Investigations, LLC (BNI)!

Real I.D., Have It Or You Can’t Fly – Mandatory Compliance By October 1, 2020

We’ve been announcing the necessity for complying with the Real ID Act of 2005 almost from the start.  Now, the deadline is fast approaching and for those who believe they have plenty of time left (think, long DMV lines) or that compliance is a choice, they will be unpleasantly surprised.

Summary of the Act: All states will be required to be in compliance by October 1, 2020.  In essence, all state-issue I.D., will have to meet the standards of a Real I.D. Basically, a Real I.D. is a state-issued enhanced driver’s (or non-driver’s id) license without which one cannot fly – even domestically without additional forms of identification – AND that pertains also to work visas, delivery bonds (for aliens, a form of bail, so to speak) and physical border barriers.

To provide a comprehensive understanding of this law, below are the basics:

Real ID Act

The Real ID Act of 2005Pub.L. 109–13, 119 Stat. 302, enacted May 11, 2005, is an Act of Congress that modifies U.S. federal law pertaining to securityauthentication, and issuance procedures standards for state driver’s licenses and identity documents, as well as various immigration issues pertaining to terrorism.

The law sets forth requirements for state driver’s licenses and ID cards to be accepted by the federal government for “official purposes”, as defined by the Secretary of the United States Department of Homeland Security. The Secretary of Homeland Security has defined “official purposes” as boarding commercially operated airline flights, and entering federal buildings and nuclear power plants, although the law gives the Secretary the unlimited authority to require a “federal identification” for any other purposes.[4]

The Real ID Act implements the following:

  • Title II of the act establishes new federal standards for state-issued driver’s licenses and non-driver identification cards.
  • Changing visa limits for temporary workers, nurses, and Australian citizens.
  • Funding some reports and pilot projects related to border security.
  • Introducing rules covering “delivery bonds” (similar to bail, but for aliens who have been released pending hearings).
  • Updating and tightening the laws on application for asylum and deportation of aliens for terrorism.
  • Waiving laws that interfere with construction of physical barriers at the borders.

On December 20, 2013, the Department of Homeland Security announced that implementation of Phase 1 would begin on January 20, 2014, which followed a yearlong period of “deferred enforcement”. There are four planned phases, three of which apply to areas that affect relatively few U.S. citizens—e.g., DHS headquarters, nuclear power plants, and restricted and semi-restricted federal facilities such as military bases.[5] On January 8, 2016, DHS issued an implementation schedule for Phase 4, stating that starting January 22, 2018 “passengers with a driver’s license issued by a state that is still not compliant with the REAL ID Act (and has not been granted an extension) will need to show an alternative form of acceptable identification for domestic air travel to board their flight”. Starting October 1, 2020 “every air traveler will need a REAL ID-compliant license, or another acceptable form of identification, for domestic air travel.”[6] As of November 2018, 38 states and territories have been certified as compliant, and 18 have been granted extensions.[7]

Save yourselves the last-minute, hours-long visit to the DMV in your respective states by applying for your Real I.D. as soon as possible.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

 

 

 

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