• Categories

  • Pages

  • Archives

Protect Your Privacy: Block Your Phone Number or Display A Fake Phone Number

At some point or other, we’ve all had the desire or need to make a phone call yet did not wish to reveal our phone number.  Below are three methods of phone number blocking that work and can be enacted immediately.

1. Use a caller ID blocking prefix. In many countries, you can enter a code before you dial a number and your phone number will be blocked from appearing on the recipient’s caller ID. The code varies depending on your country and your service provider, and it is not possible to block in all countries. Enter the prefix, followed immediately by the number you are dialing. For example, if you are in the US and want to call (555)123-4567, you would enter *675551234567.

  • North America – *67 or #31#
  • Albania, Australia, Denmark, Greece, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Sweden, Norway: #31#
  • Argentina, Iceland, Switzerland, South Africa: *31*
  • Germany: *31# or #31#
  • Hong Kong: 133
  • Japan: 184
  • UK and Ireland: 141
  • New Zealand: 0197 (Telecom) or *67 (Vodafone)
  • Australia: 1831 or #31#
  • India: *31# – Must be enabled by network.
  • If your country is not listed, chances are you can use either *67 or #31#. Most GSM mobile networks work with #31#.

2. Contact your carrier. If you want all of your phone calls to always be blocked, you can contact your carrier and set up permanent Caller ID blocking. There is typically a charge for this, and the fees and terms will vary from carrier to carrier.

  • Most pre-paid plans cannot enable permanent Caller ID blocking.
  • Some people have Anonymous Call Rejection enabled, which means your call will not be able to be completed unless you call from an unblocked number.

3. Hide your number through your device’s settings. Many phones allow you to block your Caller ID information by changing the phone’s settings. If your phone does not have the option to do this, then it is not allowed by your carrier, and you will have to try one of the previous steps.

  • iPhone – Open the Settings app, tap Phone, tap Show My Caller ID, and then toggle the slider to ON.
  • Android 4.0 and earlier – Open the Settings app, tap Call, tap “Additional settings”, tap Caller ID, and then tap “Hide number”.
  • Android 4.1 and later – Open the Phone app, tap the Menu button, tap “Call settings”, tap Caller ID, tap “Hide number”.
  • Windows Phone 8 – Open the Phone app, tap the More button (…), tap “settings”, tap the box under “Show my caller ID to”, tap “no one” or “my contacts”.
  • BlackBerry – Press the Menu key, click Options, click General Options, find the Restrict My Identity field, set it to Always.

Fake Phone Number: If however you wish to display a fake phone number, try one of the many apps available that do just that – pop up a fake phone number on your target’s phone.  A new app on the market also allows you to change your voice to sound like a man or a woman: FakeCallerID.  Let’s bear in mind that ultimately, all fake phone numbers are logged somewhere and if necessary, law enforcement can certainly obtain these records.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

How To Tell If You Are Being Tracked Via Cell Phone.

spying

Have an unshakable feeling that someone is tracking your whereabouts and conversations via your cell phone? Given the ease of use and access to spyware tools these days, coupled with your involvement in a hostile situation (divorce, child custody or partnership split), you just might be right.  Know what to look for and what to do.

Access is key

Since installing tracking apps and spyware requires physical access to your phone, the easiest way to prevent these mobile intrusions is to keep your phone secure. Obviously, though, you can’t take your phone everywhere – you have to shower sometime – make sure you set a PIN to your phone – and make it a difficult one (no birthdays, addresses, anniversaries, etc.).

Has your iPhone been “jailbroken”?

In order to install tracking or spyware to your iPhone, a process called “jailbreaking” is required to bypass Apple’s strict security.  The person tracking you may have been in a rush and they might not have deleted jailbreaking apps, the most commonly used are: Cydia, Icy, Installer, Installous and SBSettings.  Simply swipe right on your home screen to search your phone, as they won’t necessarily show up with an app icon.

Check your bills

If there’s a tracking app or spyware on your phone, it will more than likely contain a GPS aspect to it which would send your data usage through the roof.   Check your bill for a spike in this usage.

Signs you may have tracking apps or spyware installed

There are tell-tale signs that your phone might be tracking you without your knowledge, such as:

  • Does the battery run down a lot quicker than it should, and stay warm even when idle?
  • Does it stay lit when you try to turn the screen off, or light up when you’re not doing anything?
  • Is it slower running apps than normal?
  • Are there unfamiliar applications running in the background?
  • Does it take forever to shut down?

Don’t ignore odd messages

If you receive a text message full of what looks like computer code, or garbled numbers, it is possible it’s an ‘instruction’ message sent by the remote controller of the tracking software on your phone; the spyware works by receiving such messages and although they are meant to go unnoticed, may sometimes appear in your inbox.

How to remove tracking apps and spyware

Keep your phone’s software up to date, use anti-malware software and delete anything suspicious. But the only sure way is to do a full backup to your computer, reset your phone to factory settings and then reinstall everything one by one, making sure to only reinstall apps you know and trust.

If you’re using an iPhone that you suspect has been jailbroken, upgrade to the latest version of iOS as this will reverse the jailbreak and remove the malignant software – just make sure you’re backed up first.

Finally, run one of the below top five (as determined by Lifehacker) malware removal products:

  • Spybot Search & Destroy (Windows, Freeware)
  • SUPERAntiSpyware (Windows, $30)
  • ComboFix (Windows, Freeware)
  • Malwarebytes’ Anti-Malware (Windows, $25)
  • HijackThis (Windows, Freeware)

(They are found on CNet and, reviewed there as well.)

The bottom line is situational awareness.  If you are in the process of a divorce, business partnership split-up, other litigation, etc.  believe that someone will try to get an inside peek into your life.  Remain vigilant.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

%d bloggers like this: