Uncovering the Bullies: Monitoring Your Child’s Cell Phone

It is rare that we release information that can be used in a negative manner but our concern over the sharp rise of child suicides – often due to bullying –  has caused us to take this unusual step to inform those who need to know: how to monitor their child’s cell phone.  (For those who choose to use this information for nefarious purposes – don’t be a jackass. That you need to rely on this article to spy on someone proves that you are clueless. You will be caught – your spying activity on others, without their express permission, is illegal.)

mSpy (Spy App for iPhone)

mSpy is very easy to use. All you have to do is install the mSpy app on the target phone and then activate it using your license code. Once that’s done, you’ll be able to monitor the phone’s activity remotely through the mSpy online portal.

Once mSpy is activated, you can log in to the online portal to access information collected from the target phone such as messages (texts, WhatsApp and other messaging apps), phone calls, browsing history, and GPS location. mSpy is easy to use but also has many advanced features including social media monitoring, keylogger, no-jailbreak version, parental controls and more.

  • Social Media Monitoring: mSpy tracks your child’s activity on Facebook, Snapchat, Hangouts, WhatsApp, and Skype.
  • Keylogger: It records every keystroke made by the user. If your child uses an instant messaging app that mSpy can’t track directly, you can still see every keystroke typed.
  • No Jailbreak Solution: The mSpy iPhone spy software allows you to spy on your child’s iPhone without jailbreaking it. This technique works by pulling data from iCloud backups. You will need to know your child’s Apple ID and password.
  • Parental Controls: mSpy can be used as a parental control software for mobile phone. It allows parents to block inappropriate websites and incoming calls. In addition, you can control which apps can be used and when on your child’s phone.
  • Price: mSpy Basic costs $29.99 per month; mSpy Premium costs $69.99 per month or $199.99 per year.

 

Highster Mobile (Spy App for Android)

Highster Mobile is also simple to install and use.  Just download and install it onto the target phone, enter your license key, and you are good to go.  There are no settings or options to configure. After installation, you can log into your account and start tracking.

While Highster doesn’t have as many features as mSpy, but it’s a great app for those who want to spy on an Android phone without rooting or unlocking the phone. It has most of the features you’ll likely need.

  • Real-time GPS Tracking: Know where they are at all times and know where they are going. Track their cell phone location history & current location. Locations are displayed on a map on the company’s website.
  • Text Message Monitoring: Read their text messages, even those that have been deleted. Keeps a running record of all text messages sent and received.
  • View Call Logs: View the phone’s call history, including calls made, calls received, calls missed, phone numbers, and the date, time, and duration of the calls.
  • View Photos: All of the photos on their phone will be uploaded to your account.
  • View Browsing History: Track which websites they’ve visited and what they’ve searched for.
  • View Contacts, Calendar & Apps: View their contacts, calendar entries and installed apps.
  • Social Media Monitoring: Monitor different social media apps they use and who they talk to, including Facebook, WhatsApp, and even Snapchat messages. This feature, however, is only available on rooted devices. (If you do not know what this means (rooting or jailbreaking), or the consequences, don’t even think about it.)
  • Price: It only costs a one-time fee of $69.99 – making it one of the cheapest spy apps on the market today.

There are more high-end cell phone spy apps that have many more features: such as recording phone calls and even surroundings but we suggest training wheels at first.  This is your child, not an international, deep-cover spy.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

Why Lawyers Should Be Paranoid About Client Confidentiality

From Clio, January, 2017:

In April 2016, a lawsuit was filed claiming one Chicago-based law firm had failed to protect confidential client information.

The suit didn’t accuse lawyers at the firm of inadvertently sharing client information. In fact, according to The American Lawyer, “[t]he complaint makes no claim that data was stolen or used against clients.” The claim solely focuses on the fact that lax data security could have put client information at risk.

Talk about an eye-opener, for lawyers and others (such as private investigators) who retain confidential information during the normal course of business.  And, it could be inadvertent actions – usually online – that can cause these security breaches.

Client confidentiality in the age of social media:

Consider the amount of information that gets shared on social media:

  • Facebook users send 31.25 million messages per minute
  • Twitter users send nearly 350,000 tweets per minute
  • Instagram users post almost 50,000 photos each minute

If you’re a lawyer, you need to take extra care when using social media. There are plenty of ways your tweets or posts could inadvertently breach client confidentiality.

For example, if you use Swarm to check in at Starbucks during a client meeting, you could inadvertently disclose your client’s location as well. This may be an issue if your client wishes to remain anonymous, or if they don’t want it to be known that they have legal representation.

Photos can also be a problem. You should be more aware than lawyer and politician Kris Kobach, who accidentally revealed notes on proposed immigration policy in a photo with Donald Trump. You should always be extremely aware of what might be in the eye of a camera lens. Your son could take an impromptu photo while you’re catching up on some work at the dining room table; if there’s any sensitive information is visible in the image,  you need to make sure that photo doesn’t get posted online (and does get deleted from his device).

Steps lawyers need to take on social media

Does this mean you need to stop using social media? No. But you do need to reconcile the practice of sharing information online with the need to keep client information confidential.

Here are a few things you can do to ensure you’re protecting client information:

  • Go private on Facebook. This is a simple step for all lawyers (and for anyone using Facebook, for that matter). Go to “Settings,”, then “Privacy,” and set all of the visibility options so that only “Friends” can see your profile. If you want to market your law firm on Facebook, set up a separate Facebook page—and be extra mindful of the information you’re sharing on it.
  • Use two-factor authentication. Using two-factor authentication to protect your online accounts is one of the most effective steps you can take to protect client information.
  • Don’t use live mic technology. Someone’s always listening. Amazon hasn’t given up user data in this now-infamous murder case from late 2016 (so far), but that doesn’t mean you should put client information at risk by keeping an Echo or an equivalent device inside your office.  And definitely ensure that no one in your office is walking around with a live mic device.

In short, you want to do everything you can to prevent unauthorized access to client information. In 2017, that means a lot more than just shutting the door each time you meet with your clients.

BNI Operatives; situationally aware.

As always, be safe.

 

Working Around Invisible or Partially Available Social Media Profiles

As part of our due diligence during a subject’s comprehensive background check, we generally begin with a review of social media.  Sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn are primary and initial stops in the identification verification aspect of a background check. (For the purpose of this week’s article, we will concentrate on business connection site, LinkedIn.)
Searching for your subject through Linkedin may return an invisible profile if you’re not in your subject’s connections network. Your Linkedin network consists of your 1st, 2nd and 3rd degree connections and your group members. The more connections, the more full profiles available to you. You can also see attachments such as resumes.

Once you have your subject’s Linkedin profile, Google the name or search for it through bing.com to get the profile URL.

Linkedin Profile at Bing

Paste that URL into a private viewing web browser.

Private Linkedin Profile

This result is what we want to view and download.

See Resume

If the Linkedin resume is stored at their slideshare.net account, you can find it via a quick Google search- while in an incognito browser session:

Slideshare Resume Search

Select the top entry link and you will be taken to the full resume.  Download.

Slideshare resume download

Mission accomplished! The above method is a viable workaround to the limitations placed on profile sharing by social media.  Where there’s a will…

BNI Operatives; Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.

Is Your Loved One A Victim Of Social Media Abuse?

social media

Recently, online news publication, ProPublica, “Journalism for the Public Interest”, posted 36 incidents (from 2012) of elder humiliation and abuse in which workers at nursing homes and assisted-living centers shared photos or videos of residents on social media networks. The incident details come from government inspection reports, court cases and media reports and depict helpless facility-care residents in embarrassing nude or partially nude poses or actually being assaulted.

We noticed that the social media venues began years ago with permanent posts on Facebook and Instagram and graduated today to disappearing (or so they thought) posts on Snapchat.

Several disturbing true incidents cited:

 

Date: March 2014

Facility: Rosewood Care Center

City: St. Charles

State: IL

Type of facility: Nursing home

How it became public: Government inspection report, news story, criminal charges

Social media site: Snapchat

Description: One nursing home assistant recorded another using a nylon strap to lightly slap the face of a 97-year-old resident with dementia. The video was posted on Snapchat. On it, the resident could be heard crying out “Don’t! Don’t!” as the employees laughed. They were fired, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count of battery and were sentenced to probation and community service. Ivy Gleeson, the nursing home administrator, told the Chicago Tribune in 2014 that the two women were fired. “In our facility, resident safety is our utmost concern,” Gleeson said. She did not return calls and emails from ProPublica seeking comment.

 

Date: February 2015

Facility: Autumn Care Center (now Price Road Health and Rehabilitation Center)

City: Newark

State: OH

Type of facility: Nursing home

How it became public: Government inspection report

Social media site: Snapchat

Description: Someone from the community called the facility after being disturbed by a nursing assistant’s posting on Snapchat of two residents lying in bed in hospital gowns being coached to say “I’m in love with the coco” (lyrics of a gangster rap song). As the male resident said the words, a banner appeared across his chest that said, “Hahahhahaha omg” with three laughing emoticons; as the female repeated the words, a banner across her chest said, “Got these hoes trained.” The female resident’s son said his mother would have been embarrassed because she had previously worked as a church secretary for 30 years. After facility staff learned of the conduct, they allowed the nursing assistant to complete her shift. The director of nursing said she did not send her home because “she didn’t know the identity of the residents on the video and didn’t feel it was abuse.” The nursing assistant subsequently resigned. “A systemic breakdown in implementing the facility abuse policy was identified,” inspectors wrote. The home’s current owner, Greystone Healthcare Management, took over days after the incident. A spokeswoman said it “provides extensive, on-going training, support and oversight to insure that we provide patient centered care.”

I can’t begin to express the enormous anger I felt in reading the above sickening recounts of elder and infirm abuse. We need to protect our most vulnerable members of society.

So how do we fight back?  Our suggestion is to insist that the nursing home allow your elderly or infirm relative to have a smartphone or laptop in their room. Install LogMein or any other remote access app on the device.  You should be allowed to visually access or record the patient 24/7.   I’m sure the facility will cite privacy issues but the question is –   for whom? Is their concern for our relative’s privacy or their private actions with our relative?

Feel welcome to provide us feedback.  We will all get old (as my Dad used to say, if we are lucky) and will be in positions where we will need the help of others.  Now is the time to ensure proper monitoring of our elderly, sick or injured while we face the issue head on.

BNI Operatives: Situationally aware.

As always, stay safe.